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1. Undertail {Girls Like Girls}

  • Published: 2016-02-20T19:17:28+00:00
  • Duration: 240
  • By Mystery NA
Undertail {Girls Like Girls}

Request video :) Before reuploading this video, I changed a few of the photos and took out anything nsfw related. There are still a couple but they are really minor.


2. Common moorhen

  • Published: 2015-04-21T18:20:56+00:00
  • Duration: 125
  • By Per J Naesje
Common moorhen

The Common moorhen is a breeding bird at Lake Østensjø, Oslo Norway. Hides in dense vegetation and can be difficult to observe. The moorhen is a distinctive species, with dark plumage apart from the white undertail, yellow legs and a red frontal shield Sivhøna hekker på Østensjøvannet. Den gjemmer seg ofte i tett vegetasjon og kan være vanskelig å få øye på. Sivhøna er en karakteristisk fugl med mørk fjærdrakt, lysere underside, gule ben og rød markering på nebb


3. dancing-with-gazelle-papyrus


4. Red-Footed Falcon (Falco vespertinus)

  • Published: 2013-06-24T09:42:04+00:00
  • Duration: 63
  • By Eyal Bartov
Red-Footed Falcon (Falco vespertinus)

Published on 7 May 2013 Video photographer: Eyal Bartov: [email protected] Music by: Israel Kasif: [email protected] The Red-footed Falcon (Falco vespertinus), formerly Western Red-footed Falcon, is a bird of prey. It belongs to the family Falconidae, the falcons. This bird is found in eastern Europe and Asia although its numbers are dwindling rapidly due to habitat loss and hunting. It is migratory, wintering in Africa. It is a regular wanderer to western Europe, and in August 2004 a Red-footed Falcon was found in North America for the first time on the island of Martha's Vineyard, Massachusetts. The Amur Falcon was formerly included herein as a subspecies but it is nowadays considered well distinct. Nonetheless, it is the present species' closest relative; their relationship to other falcons is more enigmatic. They appear morphologically somewhat intermediate between kestrels and hobbies and DNA sequence data has been unable to further resolve this question, mainly due to lack of comprehensive sampling. They might be closer to the Merlin than to most other living falcons, or more generally related to this species and American falcons such as the American Kestrel and the Aplomado Falcon. It is a medium-small, long-winged species. The adult male is all blue-grey, except for his red undertail and legs; its underwings are uniformly grey. The female has a grey back and wings, orange head and underparts, and a white face with black eye stripe and moustaches. Young birds are brown above and buff below with dark streaks, and a face pattern like the female. Red-footed Falcons are 28--34 cm (11--13½ in) in length with a wingspan of 65--75 cm (25½--29½ in). The average mass is 155 g (5.5 oz) This is a diurnal bird of open country with some trees, often near water. Its distinctive method of hunting is shared by the Common Kestrel. It regularly hovers, searching the ground below, then makes a short steep dive towards the target. The Red-footed Falcon's main prey is large insects, but it will also take small mammals and birds. This falcon is a colonial breeder, reusing the old nests of corvids, such as Rooks. It lays two to four eggs. Its maximum lifespan is 13.25 years in the wild and 18 years in captivity.From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


5. Ferruginous duck - Europese witoogeend - Aythya nyroca

  • Published: 2016-06-05T18:43:05+00:00
  • Duration: 332
  • By Watervogelbond
Ferruginous duck - Europese witoogeend - Aythya nyroca

The ferruginous duck, also ferruginous pochard (Aythya nyroca) is a medium-sized diving duck from Eurasia. The species is known colloquially by birders as "fudge duck". Their breeding habitat is marshes and lakes with a metre or more water depth. These ducks breed in southern and eastern Europe and southern and western Asia. They are somewhat migratory, and winter farther south and into north Africa . The adult male is a rich chestnut colour with a darker back and a yellow eye. The pure white undertail helps to distinguish this species from the somewhat similar tufted duck. The female is similar but duller, and with a dark eye. These are gregarious birds, forming large flocks in winter, often mixed with other diving ducks, such as tufted ducks and common pochards. Hybrids between this species and the common pochard are sometimes referred to as "Paget's pochard". These birds feed mainly by diving or dabbling. They eat aquatic plants with some molluscs, aquatic insects and small fish. They often feed at night, and will upend (dabble) for food as well as the more characteristic diving. It is one of the species to which the Agreement on the Conservation of African-Eurasian Migratory Waterbirds (AEWA) applies


6. Straw-Necked Ibis - Strohalsibis - Threskiornis spinicollis

  • Published: 2014-12-04T09:47:49+00:00
  • Duration: 292
  • By Watervogelbond
Straw-Necked Ibis - Strohalsibis - Threskiornis spinicollis

The straw-necked ibis (Threskiornis spinicollis) is a bird of the ibis and spoonbill family Threskiornithidae. It can be found throughout Australia, New Guinea, and parts of Indonesia. Adults have distinctive straw-like feathers on their neck. Straw-necked ibises are large birds, around 60–75 cm (23.5–29.5 in) long. They have dark wings that show an iridescent, multicoloured sheen in sunlight, and have a dark back and collar. Most of the neck is white, as are the underparts and undertail. They have a long, black, downcurved bill, and their legs are usually red near the top and dark grey toward the feet. Straw-like feathers on the neck of adults give the bird its common name. Sexes are similar, although males have longer bills and females have a dark band across their upper breast. Juveniles have duller colors and shorter bills with less curvature, and lack the straw-like plumes on the neck. They build a large, rough, cup-shaped nest of sticks and trampled plants among reeds, paperbarks, bulrushes, or trees over water. They build in colonies, often with the Australian white ibis. Breeding season may be around March in the north, and July–December in the south, but can occur throughout the year after heavy rain in some areas. Nests are used year after year.


7. Pied-billed grebe - Dikbekfuut - Podilymbus podiceps

  • Published: 2016-09-18T10:59:21+00:00
  • Duration: 360
  • By Watervogelbond
Pied-billed grebe - Dikbekfuut  - Podilymbus podiceps

The pied-billed grebe (Podilymbus podiceps) is a species of the grebe family of water birds. Since the Atitlán grebe (Podilymbus gigas) has become extinct, it is the sole extant member of the genus Podilymbus. The pied-billed grebe is primarily found in ponds throughout the Americas. Other names of this grebe include American dabchick, dabchick, Carolina grebe, devil-diver, dive-dapper, dipper, hell-diver, pied-billed dabchick, pied-bill, thick-billed grebe, and water witch. Pied-billed grebes are small, stocky, and short-necked. They are 31–38 cm (12–15 in) in length, with a wingspan of 45–62 cm (18–24 in) and weigh 253–568 g (8.9–20.0 oz).[9] They are mainly brown, with a darker crown and back.Their brown color serves as camouflage in the marshes they live in. They do not have white under their wings when flying, like other grebes. Their undertail is white and they have a short, blunt chicken-like bill that is a light grey color, which in su mmer is encircled by a broad black band (hence the name). I In the summer, its throat is black. There is no sexual dimorphism. Juveniles have black and white stripes and look more like winter adults. This grebe does not have webbed feet. Its toes have lobes that come out of the side of each toe. These lobes allow for easy paddling. When flying, the feet appear behind the body due to the feet's placement in the far back of the body. It may be confused with the least grebe, although that species is much smaller and has a thinner bill. Other similarly sized grebes are very distinct in plumage, i.e. the eared grebe and horned grebe. Both species bear much more colorful breeding plumage, with rufous sides, golden crests along the side of the head against contrasting slaty color (also a rufous neck in the horned); while in winter, both the eared and horned grebes are pied with slaty and cream color and have red eyes. The pied-billed grebe breeds in south-central Canada, throughout the United States, Central America, the Caribbean, and temperate South America. These grebes may lay up to two sets of eggs a year. Their nests sit on top of the water, their eggs sitting in vegetation that resides in the water.Grebes lay between three and ten bluish white smooth elliptical eggs with the female starting the incubation process. They are incubated for around 23 days by both parents, with the female taking over incubation duties towards the end of that time period. They will cover the nest with nesting material if they have to leave it for an extended period of time. Young grebes may leave the nest within one day of hatching. They are downy at birth. Yellow skin is seen between the lore and top of the head. They do not swim well and stay out of the water. They sleep on their parents' backs. Within four weeks they start swimming. When alerted they will climb on the back of a parent grebe and eventually mature to dive under the water like their parents. Both parents share the role of raising the young – both feeding and carrying them on their backs.Sometimes the parents will dive underwater to get food with the chicks on their backs.


8. Common moorhen - Waterhoen - Gallinula chloropus

  • Published: 2015-03-22T14:40:59+00:00
  • Duration: 306
  • By Watervogelbond
Common moorhen - Waterhoen - Gallinula chloropus

The common moorhen (Gallinula chloropus) (also known as the swamp chicken is a bird species in the family Rallidae. It is distributed across many parts of the Old World. The common moorhen lives around well-vegetated marshes, ponds, canals and other wetlands. The species is not found in the polar regions or many tropical rainforests. Elsewhere it is likely the most common rail species, except for the Eurasian coot in some regions. The closely related common gallinule of the New World has been recognized as a separate species by most authorities, starting with the American Ornithologists' Union and the International Ornithological Committee in 2011. The moorhen is a distinctive species, with dark plumage apart from the white undertail, yellow legs and a red frontal shield. The young are browner and lack the red shield. The frontal shield of the adult has a rounded top and fairly parallel sides; the tailward margin of the red unfeathered area is a smooth waving line. In the related common gallinule of the Americas, the frontal shield has a fairly straight top and is less wide towards the bill, giving a marked indentation to the back margin of the red area. The common moorhen gives a wide range of gargling calls and will emit loud hisses when threatened. A midsized to large rail, it can range from 30 to 38 cm (12 to 15 in) in length and span 50 to 62 cm (20 to 24 in) across the wings. The body mass of this species can range from 192 to 500 g (6.8 to 17.6 oz). This is a common breeding bird in marsh environments and well-vegetated lakes. Populations in areas where the waters freeze, such as eastern Europe, will migrate to more temperate climes. This species will consume a wide variety of vegetable material and small aquatic creatures. They forage beside or in the water, sometimes walking on lilypads or upending in the water to feed. They are often secretive, but can become tame in some areas. Despite loss of habitat in parts of its range, the common moorhen remains plentiful and widespread. The birds are territorial during breeding season. The nest is a basket built on the ground in dense vegetation. Laying starts in spring, between mid-March and mid-May in Northern hemisphere temperate regions. About 8 eggs are usually laid per female early in the season; a brood later in the year usually has only 5–8 or fewer eggs. Nests may be re-used by different females. Incubation lasts about three weeks. Both parents incubate and feed the young. These fledge after 40–50 days, become independent usually a few weeks thereafter, and may raise their first brood the next spring. When threatened, the young may cling to the parents' body, after which the adult birds fly away to safety, carrying their offspring with them. On a global scale – all subspecies taken together – the common moorhen is as abundant as its vernacular name implies. It is therefore considered a species of Least Concern by the IUCN. However, small populations may be prone to extinction. The population of Palau, belonging to the widespread subspecies G. c. orientalis and locally known as debar (a generic term also used for ducks and meaning roughly "waterfowl"), is very rare, and apparently the birds are hunted by locals. Most of the population on the archipelago occurs on Angaur and Peleliu, while the species is probably already gone from Koror. In the Lake Ngardok wetlands of Babeldaob, a few dozen still occur, but the total number of common moorhens on Palau is about in the same region as the Guam population: fewer than 100 adult birds (usually fewer than 50) have been encountered in any survey. The common moorhen is one of the birds (the other is the Eurasian coot, Fulica atra) from which the cyclocoelid flatworm parasite Cyclocoelum mutabile was first described. The bird is also parasitised by the moorhen flea, Dasypsyllus gallinulae. Five subspecies are today considered valid; several more have been described that are now considered junior synonyms. Most are not very readily recognizable, as differences are rather subtle and often clinal. Usually, the location of a sighting is the most reliable indication as to subspecies identification, but the migratory tendencies of this species make identifications based on location not completely reliable. In addition to the extant subspecies listed below, an undescribed form from the Early Pleistocene is recorded from Dursunlu in Turkey.


9. Custom 2006 Yamaha R1 Dyno Runs while getting a Custom MAP/Tune (Dash View)

Custom 2006 Yamaha R1 Dyno Runs while getting a Custom MAP/Tune (Dash View)

This is a custom 2006 Yamaha R1, fully custom built with 240 wide tire kit and many other goodies including platinum suspension Bleed and Feed rear air ride suspension. These are NA runs (no nitrous) on beginning of custom tune. Clutch was slipping in high RPMs. -KN Air filter -Factory Pro Billet race velocity stacks -Power commander USB III w/ HUB module/switch for NA map and nitrous map -Hotbodies undertail race slip-ons (open muffler) -Akrapovic race Y-Pipe (Cat eliminator) -Graves motorsports Emissions block of kit. -Nitrous Express Dry nitrous kit -Other custom mods and tricks by Jackel Motorsports These are NA runs (no nitrous) on beginning of custom tune. Clutch was slipping in high RPMs. Future dyno runs with new clutch and nitrous runs coming soon! Dyno sheets to be posted as well. All work and tune performed by Jackel Motorsports www.Jackelmoto.com 719-648-6520


10. GoPro Trial Run - Rear View

  • Published: 2009-03-24T17:05:11+00:00
  • Duration: 544
  • By William Akers
GoPro Trial Run - Rear View

Running some roads in Goochland with the GoPro mounted undertail.


11. Upland sandpiper - Bartrams ruiter - Bartramia longicauda

  • Published: 2017-06-30T09:19:00+00:00
  • Duration: 343
  • By Watervogelbond
Upland sandpiper - Bartrams ruiter - Bartramia longicauda

The upland sandpiper (Bartramia longicauda) is a large sandpiper, closely related to the curlews. Older names are the upland plover and Bartram's sandpiper. In Louisiana, it is also colloquially known as the papabotte. It is the only member of the genus Bartramia. The genus name and the old common name Bartram's sandpiper commemorate the American naturalist William Bartram. The species name longicauda is from Latin longus, "long" and caudus, "tail". The name "Bartram's sandpiper" was made popular by Alexander Wilson, who was taught ornithology and natural history illustration by Bartram. An adult is roughly 30 cm (12 in) long with a 66 cm (26 in) wingspan. The average weight is 170 g (6 oz). This odd bird has a small dove-like head on a long neck. It is heavily marbled black and brown on the back and wings. The neck is streaked with dark brown which continues down to the breast and on to the flanks. The belly and undertail coverts are white. The tail is quite long for a sandpiper. The upland also sports a white eye-ring and long yellow legs. Even though they are sandpipers, they prefer open country with tall grasses to coastal habitat. They are also found at airports, blueberry farms and abandoned strip mines in the east. Their true core range and habitat is in the northern midwest United States. Upland sandpipers can sometimes be found in small, loose nesting colonies. The breeding season is from early-to-late summer; nests are located on the ground in dense grass. The female lays 4 eggs. Both parents look after the young and may perform distraction displays to lure predators away from the nest or young birds.


12. Custom 2006 Yamaha R1 Dyno Runs while getting a Custom MAP/Tune (Rear r. side view)

Custom 2006 Yamaha R1 Dyno Runs while getting a Custom MAP/Tune (Rear r. side view)

This is a custom 2006 Yamaha R1, fully custom built with 240 wide tire kit and many other goodies including platinum suspension Bleed and Feed rear air ride suspension. These are NA runs (no nitrous) on beginning of custom tune. Clutch was slipping in high RPMs. -KN Air filter -Factory Pro Billet race velocity stacks -Power commander USB III w/ HUB module/switch for NA map and nitrous map -Hotbodies undertail race slip-ons (open muffler) -Akrapovic race Y-Pipe (Cat eliminator) -Graves motorsports Emissions block of kit. -Nitrous Express Dry nitrous kit -Other custom mods and tricks by Jackel Motorsports These are NA runs (no nitrous) on beginning of custom tune. Clutch was slipping in high RPMs. Future dyno runs with new clutch and nitrous runs coming soon! Dyno sheets to be posted as well. All work and tune performed by Jackel Motorsports www.Jackelmoto.com 719-648-6520


13. American Redstart Portrait

  • Published: 2012-07-17T17:45:05+00:00
  • Duration: 204
  • By Larry Bond
American Redstart Portrait

Warblers have been described as the butterflies of the bird world. Although this bird is not called a warbler in its name, it is called an American Redstart, it epitomizes this characterization of warblers. It is very flighty and very bold in its coloration. The American Redstart is a common warbler found in deciduous forest understory especially near water. The male has a glossy black head and body with radiant orange patches on sides, wings, and tail. It has a white belly and undertail coverts. The female has gray-olive upperparts, white below with yellow patches on her wings and tail. This warbler is a very active flycatcher. It often fans its tail and spreads its wings when perched. The song is a "zee zee zee zee zwee".


14. Warber Guide App - Using the Filter Feature

Warber Guide App - Using the Filter Feature

The Warbler Guide App is the perfect companion to Princeton’s revolutionary and widely acclaimed book The Warbler Guide, by Tom Stephenson and Scott Whittle. Taking full advantage of the Apple iOS® platform, the app allows you to identify birds by view or song, quickly and intuitively. Exciting new 3D graphics enable you to view a bird from the exact angle you see it in the field. And the whole range of warbler songs is easily played, compared, and filtered. Whether for study or field use, this innovative app delivers the full power of The Warbler Guide in your pocket, built from the ground up for the Apple iOS® platform, and complete with unique new app-only features. Breakthrough features from The Warbler Guide book that are included in the app: Rapid and confident two-step ID process using visual finders and comparison species The first complete treatment of warbler songs, using a new objective vocabulary An intuitive visual finder that includes side, 45 degree, and undertail views Master Pages with detailed ID points Complete guide to determining the age and sex of warblers with photos of all ages and sexes Annotated sonograms showing song structure and key ID points Complete songs, chip calls, and flight calls for all species Comparison species for making confident visual and audio IDs Many additional photos to show behavior and reinforce key ID points Highlighted diagnostic ID points Color Impression Icons for narrowing down ID of warblers from the briefest glimpses Behavior and habitat icons Unique new app-only features: 3D models of birds in all plumages, rotatable and pinch-zoomable to match field experience of a bird Intuitive, visual, and interactive finders with filters for possible species based on audio and visual criteria chosen by the user Playback of all songs and vocalizations with sonograms makes study of vocalizations easy iPhone® and iPad® versions let you take these useful tools into the field Selectable finder sortings grouped by color, alphabetical order, song type, and taxonomic order Interactive song finder using objective vocabulary for fast ID of unknown songs Simultaneous visual and song finders makes identifying an unknown warbler even easier Half-speed song playback allows for easier study of song structure Comparison species with selectable side, 45 degree, and undertail views Features 75 3D images Covers 48 species and 75 plumages Includes 277 vocalizations, 156 songs, 73 contact calls, and 48 flight calls Technical Specifications: Requires iOS 7.0 or later. Compatible with iPad 2/iPhone 5 and above.


15. Warbler Guide App - 3D View Preview

Warbler Guide App -  3D View Preview

The Warbler Guide App is the perfect companion to Princeton’s revolutionary and widely acclaimed book The Warbler Guide, by Tom Stephenson and Scott Whittle. Taking full advantage of the Apple iOS® platform, the app allows you to identify birds by view or song, quickly and intuitively. Exciting new 3D graphics enable you to view a bird from the exact angle you see it in the field. And the whole range of warbler songs is easily played, compared, and filtered. Whether for study or field use, this innovative app delivers the full power of The Warbler Guide in your pocket, built from the ground up for the Apple iOS® platform, and complete with unique new app-only features. Breakthrough features from The Warbler Guide book that are included in the app: Rapid and confident two-step ID process using visual finders and comparison species The first complete treatment of warbler songs, using a new objective vocabulary An intuitive visual finder that includes side, 45 degree, and undertail views Master Pages with detailed ID points Complete guide to determining the age and sex of warblers with photos of all ages and sexes Annotated sonograms showing song structure and key ID points Complete songs, chip calls, and flight calls for all species Comparison species for making confident visual and audio IDs Many additional photos to show behavior and reinforce key ID points Highlighted diagnostic ID points Color Impression Icons for narrowing down ID of warblers from the briefest glimpses Behavior and habitat icons Unique new app-only features: 3D models of birds in all plumages, rotatable and pinch-zoomable to match field experience of a bird Intuitive, visual, and interactive finders with filters for possible species based on audio and visual criteria chosen by the user Playback of all songs and vocalizations with sonograms makes study of vocalizations easy iPhone® and iPad® versions let you take these useful tools into the field Selectable finder sortings grouped by color, alphabetical order, song type, and taxonomic order Interactive song finder using objective vocabulary for fast ID of unknown songs Simultaneous visual and song finders makes identifying an unknown warbler even easier Half-speed song playback allows for easier study of song structure Comparison species with selectable side, 45 degree, and undertail views Features 75 3D images Covers 48 species and 75 plumages Includes 277 vocalizations, 156 songs, 73 contact calls, and 48 flight calls Technical Specifications: Requires iOS 7.0 or later. Compatible with iPad 2/iPhone 5 and above.


16. Magellanic flightless steamer duck - Magelhaen booteend - Tachyeres pteneres

  • Published: 2014-03-01T17:33:51+00:00
  • Duration: 196
  • By Watervogelbond
Magellanic flightless steamer duck - Magelhaen booteend - Tachyeres pteneres

The Fuegian steamer duck (Tachyeres pteneres), also called the Magellanic flightless steamer duck, is a flightless duck from South America. It belongs to the steamer duck genus Tachyeres. It inhabits the rocky coasts and coastal islands from southern Chile and Chiloé to Tierra del Fuego, switching to the adjacent sheltered bays and lakes further inland when breeding. This is the largest of the steamer duck species. It is a massively built waterfowl at 3.5–7 kg (7.7–15.4 lb) and 65–84 cm (26–33 in) in length, with the males noticeably larger than the females. Males weigh an average of 5.34 kg (11.8 lb) while females weigh around 4.2 kg (9.3 lb) on average. The wingspan is 85–110 cm (33–43 in), the wings being too small to functionally allow the birds to take flight. Instead, the wings are used like paddles to help skim rapidly across the surface of the water. This species outweighs any other wild species called "duck" and is about the same mass as the largest wild geese in the world, although this species is only distantly related to most true ducks (for example of the genus Anas). On males, the head and neck is blue-gray, with paler coloration crown and forehead. He has a narrow white eye-ring which continuing backwards as stripe and a reddish-brown throat. His abdomen, ventral area and undertail coverts are white and the tail is grey. Females are a darker gray-brown on the head and dark reddish on the throat. Her body and wings as males, but she may have brown/wine colouring on feathers. The juvenile is similar to the female but slightly duller colored. This species either nests near water obscured in dense, shrubby vegetation or in abandoned penguin nest burrows in September through December. Between 4 and 11 eggs are laid, with an average clutch of 9. The ivory eggs measure 8.2 cm × 5.6 cm (3.2 in × 2.2 in) and weigh around 167 g (5.9 oz). Incubation occurs for 28 to 40 days. The young fledge at 120–130 days and are driven from the parent's territory by their parents and form flocks with other ousted immature steamer ducks. They become sexually mature at 2 to 3 years of age. Adult males are known to be extremely aggressive during mating season, including towards other waterfowl, but may join mixed-species winter flocks without incident. There are several potential predators of eggs and young birds: foxes, caracaras, gulls, skuas and giant petrels. Healthy adults may have no natural predators. This species lives principally off of saltwater molluscs, crustaceans and small fish. During the breeding season, they tend to eat and feed their young small snails, insect larvae, amphipods and isopods. This species is locally infamous for the aggressive disposition of adult males. Incidents have allegedly occurred where a raging male was placed by a misguided collector among adults of various other waterfowl species and killed all the other birds with its powerful, spurred wings.


17. dancing-with-gazelle_sans


18. Lesser adjutant-Javaanse marabou-Leptoptilos javanicus

  • Published: 2016-07-24T09:33:05+00:00
  • Duration: 334
  • By Watervogelbond
Lesser adjutant-Javaanse marabou-Leptoptilos javanicus

The lesser adjutant (Leptoptilos javanicus) is a large wading bird in the stork family Ciconiidae. Like other members of its genus, it has a bare neck and head. It is however more closely associated with wetland habitats where it is solitary and is less likely to scavenge than the related greater adjutant. It is a widespread species found from India through Southeast Asia to Java. A large stork with an upright stance, a bare head and neck without a pendant pouch, it has a length of 87–93 cm (34 –37 in) (outstretched from bill-to-tail measurement), weighs from 4 to 5.71 kg (8.8 to 12.6 lb) and stands about 110–1 20 cm (43–47 in) tall. The only confusable species is the greater adjutant, but this species is generally smaller and has a straight upper bill edge (culmen), measuring 25.8–30.8 cm (10.2–12.1 in) in length, with a paler base and appears slightly trimmer and less hunch-backed. The skullcap is paler and the upper plumage is uniformly dark, appearing almost all black. The nearly naked head and neck have a few scattered hair-like feathers. The upper shank or tibia is grey rather than pink, the tarsus measures 22.5–26.8 cm (8.9–10.6 in). The belly and undertail are white. Juveniles are a duller version of the adult but have more feathers on the nape. During the breeding season, the face is reddish and the neck is orange. The larger median wing coverts are tipped with copper spots and the inner secondary coverts and tertials have narrow white edging. The wing chord measures 57.5–66 cm (22.6–26.0 in) in length. Like others in the genus, they retract their necks in flight. In flight, the folded neck can appear like the pouch of the greater adjutant. Males and females appear similar in plumage but males tend to be larger and heavier billed. The lesser adjutant tends to be widely dispersed and is very local. It is often found in large rivers and lakes inside well wooded regions. It is found in India, Nepal, Sri Lanka, Bangladesh (A colony with about 6 nests and 20 individuals was discovered near Thakurgaon in 2011.Myanmar, Thailand, Vietnam, Malaysia, Laos, Singapore,Indonesia and Cambodia. The greatest populations are in Cambodia. In India they are mainly distributed in the eastern states of Assam, West Bengal and Bihar. It may occur as a vagrant on the southern edge of Bhutan They are extremely rare in southern India. The lesser adjutant stalks around wetlands feeding mainly on fish, frogs, reptiles and large invertebrates. They rarely feed on carrion. They may also take small birds and rodents particularly during the breeding season. They are solitary except during the breeding season when they form loose colonies.The breeding season is February t o May in southern India and November to January in north-eastern India. The nest is a large platform of sticks placed on a tall tree. The nest diameter is more than a metre and up to a metre deep. The clutch consists of three to four eggs. They are silent but have been noted to clatter their bill, hiss and moan at the nest.


19. Okinawa rail - Okinawaral - Gallirallus okinawae

  • Published: 2016-03-23T12:36:04+00:00
  • Duration: 219
  • By Watervogelbond
Okinawa rail - Okinawaral - Gallirallus okinawae

The Okinawa rail (Gallirallus okinawae) is a species of bird in the rail family, Rallidae. It is endemic to Okinawa Island in Japan where it is known as the Yanbaru rail. Its existence was only confirmed in 1978 and it was formally described in 1981 although unidentified rails had been recorded on the island since at least 19 73 and local stories of a bird known as the agachi kumira may refer to this species. It is a medium-sized and almost flightless rail with short wings and tail, olive-brown upperparts, black underparts with white bars and a red bill and legs. It occurs in subtropical moist forests and in neighbouring habitats. It nests and feeds on the ground but usually r oosts in trees. It is classified as an endangered species and is threatened by habitat loss and introduced predators It is about 30 cm long with a wingspan of 50 cm and a weight of around 435 g. It is almost flightless and has very short wings and tail. The bill is large and bright red with a whitish tip. The long, strong legs are red as are the iris and eye-ring.The upperparts are olive-brown while the underparts are black with narrow white bars. The face is black with a white spot between the bill and eye and a white line behind the eye, extending back to the side of the neck. The undertail-coverts are dark brown with pale bars. Juvenile birds are paler than the adults and are mottled white below rather than barred. The spot in front of the e ye is tinged with brown while the stripe behind is shorter than in the adult. The bill and iris are brownish and the legs and feet are yellow-ochre. 12 It is a noisy bird with a variety of loud calls. It calls most often early and late in the day, usually from the gr ound but sometimes from trees. Pairs often call together and up to birds have been heard in one area


20. Warbler Guide App iphone Preview

Warbler Guide App iphone Preview

The Warbler Guide App is the perfect companion to Princeton’s revolutionary and widely acclaimed book The Warbler Guide, by Tom Stephenson and Scott Whittle. Taking full advantage of the Apple iOS® platform, the app allows you to identify birds by view or song, quickly and intuitively. Exciting new 3D graphics enable you to view a bird from the exact angle you see it in the field. And the whole range of warbler songs is easily played, compared, and filtered. Whether for study or field use, this innovative app delivers the full power of The Warbler Guide in your pocket, built from the ground up for the Apple iOS® platform, and complete with unique new app-only features. Breakthrough features from The Warbler Guide book that are included in the app: Rapid and confident two-step ID process using visual finders and comparison species The first complete treatment of warbler songs, using a new objective vocabulary An intuitive visual finder that includes side, 45 degree, and undertail views Master Pages with detailed ID points Complete guide to determining the age and sex of warblers with photos of all ages and sexes Annotated sonograms showing song structure and key ID points Complete songs, chip calls, and flight calls for all species Comparison species for making confident visual and audio IDs Many additional photos to show behavior and reinforce key ID points Highlighted diagnostic ID points Color Impression Icons for narrowing down ID of warblers from the briefest glimpses Behavior and habitat icons Unique new app-only features: 3D models of birds in all plumages, rotatable and pinch-zoomable to match field experience of a bird Intuitive, visual, and interactive finders with filters for possible species based on audio and visual criteria chosen by the user Playback of all songs and vocalizations with sonograms makes study of vocalizations easy iPhone® and iPad® versions let you take these useful tools into the field Selectable finder sortings grouped by color, alphabetical order, song type, and taxonomic order Interactive song finder using objective vocabulary for fast ID of unknown songs Simultaneous visual and song finders makes identifying an unknown warbler even easier Half-speed song playback allows for easier study of song structure Comparison species with selectable side, 45 degree, and undertail views Features 75 3D images Covers 48 species and 75 plumages Includes 277 vocalizations, 156 songs, 73 contact calls, and 48 flight calls Technical Specifications: Requires iOS 7.0 or later. Compatible with iPad 2/iPhone 5 and above.